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LONDON 2017 ANNOUNCE RIGHT TO PLAY AS CHARITY PARTNER

As the athletics world descends on London, five years after the Olympics, the organising committee announced Right To Play as the official charity partner. This partnership demonstrates a continued commitment from professional sport to supporting sport for development organizations.

Right To Play uses sport and play to improve the lives of vulnerable children in some of the world’s poorest communities. Already a charity partner to British Athletics, Right To Play inspires athletics fans to give children around the world a sporting chance in life.

The IAAF World Championships take place from 4-13 August in London’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The 10-day event will include some of the biggest names in sport, with 2,000 athletes from 200 countries set to compete. Usain Bolt will race for the final time before retirement, Caster Semenya competes in both the 800m and 1500m and Mo Farah returns to the track where he won double Olympic gold in 2012.

London 2017 Ltd Championship Director, Niels de Vos said: “Having supported Right To Play since June last year when they came on board as a partner to UK Athletics, I am delighted to have them as our partner for the IAAF World Championships. These Championships give us a fantastic opportunity to shine a light on their work, alongside the world’s best athletes.”

Greg Rutherford, Olympic, World, Commonwealth and European Champion, is a Right To Play Athlete Ambassador. He said: “Right To Play and London 2017 Ltd have teamed up to put children at the heart of the World Championships and to give disadvantaged children around the world a better future, through sport and play. Many of us take playing sport for granted but not all children have the same opportunities in life. Right To Play’s approach is unique and effective and I’m proud to be their ambassador.”

“As a charity that has sport and play at its core Right To Play is a natural partner for the World Championships,” said Nikki Skipper, National Director at Right To Play UK. “The athletes competing here in London are the ultimate symbols of the power sport can have in helping individuals reach their potential. Our approach to education builds children’s confidence and life skills, enabling them to realise their own potential. Whether that is a child from a remote village in Ghana or a refugee in Lebanon – we make a real difference to children’s lives around the world.”

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